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Core Curriculum

Newcomb-Tulane College students fulfill the degree requirements outlined in the catalog of their matriculation year. The catalog content is determined by the Dean of Newcomb-Tulane College and the Newcomb-Tulane College Curriculum Committee.

The Tulane University Catalog is published by the Office of the University Registrar. To update course information or with questions about Newcomb-Tulane College catalog content, please contact the Registrar's Office at registrar@tulane.edu or (504) 865-5231. 

 

 

General Education

Approved by the Faculty, March 2017

Newcomb-Tulane College’s general education curriculum was revised to develop information literacy, critical thinking, and personal and social responsibility in our students. 

The core curriculum—which is composed of a minimum of 30 credits—is divided into two parts: proficiency requirements and a distribution of knowledge.  To ensure that students experience the breadth of knowledge at the collegiate level, AP and IB courses can be used to satisfy proficiency requirements only in Formal Reasoning and Foreign Language. 

Courses will be designated as satisfying the distribution requirements according to the content and methodology rather than the departmental affiliation of the course.

The new core curriculum general education requirements will go into effect with the entering class of 2018. 

Courses proposed to satisfy core requirements will be ratified by the Newcomb-Tulane Curriculum Committee and the Newcomb-Tulane College faculty.

Proficiency Requirements

Writing Skills

2 courses and 6 credits

Newcomb-Tulane College expects all students to demonstrate the ability to communicate successfully in writing for a variety of audiences and purposes, including academic writing, through rhetorical knowledge, critical thinking, primary and secondary research, flexible writing processes, and developing knowledge of conventions. This requirement strengthens writing skills and prepares students for the range of writing they will be called upon to produce in their lives and careers.

Requirements:

  • Tier 1: Freshman writing (ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1011) unless the student is exempt due to their score on the A.P/I.B./Cambridge-A level exams. See https://advising.tulane.edu/sites/advising.tulane.edu/files/AP-IB%20Char... to determine minimum scores required. Students receiving exemption from ENGL 1010/1011 are required to take an approved Tier-1 writing class during their first year. At least 1/3 of the grade based upon writing (excluding in class exams), but no revision is required.

  • Tier 2: One additional Tier-2 writing course at the 2000 level or above taken from an approved list. At least 1/3 of the grade based upon writing (excluding in class exams), to include revision and re-evaluation by the instructor.

Student are encouraged to take the Tier-1 writing course prior to taking the Tier-2 writing course; however, students are not prohibited from taking the Tier-1 and Tier-2 courses simultaneously.

Note: creative writing courses cannot be used to satisfy the writing proficiency requirement.

Learning Outcomes – Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the student to demonstrate their proficiency in writing through the following objectives:

  1. Demonstrates an understanding of context, audience, and purpose that is responsive to the assigned task(s).
  2. Uses appropriate content to clearly convey the writer’s understanding of the subject.
  3. Demonstrates competence in the appropriate citation systems for their academic disciplines or genres.

For Tier-2 Writing Classes, the above objectives plus:

  1. Incorporates feedback to improve quality of the writing.

 

Formal Reasoning

1 course and 3 credits

Newcomb-Tulane College expects all students to demonstrate they think with rigor and precision and can use formal or mathematical models for logical reasoning and objective analysis. Students will display basic quantitative literacy at a minimum.

Requirements:

One course in mathematics or symbolic logic (PHIL 1210)

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the students to demonstrate their proficiency in formal reasoning through the following objectives:

  1. Formulates appropriate questions and propositions for quantitative analysis.
  2. Uses the quantitative analysis of data to draw appropriate conclusions.
  3. Demonstrates the ability to assess the validity and limitations of quantitative models.

Foreign Language

0-3 courses

In an increasingly interconnected world, it is essential that Newcomb-Tulane College students learn to understand and communicate in languages other than English. Beyond practical considerations, language education opens doors to the wide variety of human cultures and histories that are a critical part of learning to cooperate and solving global problems. Students should demonstrate a linguistic knowledge other than their language of origin.

Requirements:

The foreign language proficiency requirement is achieved in any of the following ways:

  • Passing grade in a course at the 2030 level (3rd semester of Tulane 4-credit hour Foreign Language coursework) or higher in accordance with assigned placement level
  • Passing grade on a Tulane-administered proficiency exam for students with assigned placements above the 2030 level. Students who do not successfully pass the proficiency exam will be automatically placed and must successfully complete a course at the 2030 level.
  • Passing grade in a course at the level of placement above 2030
  • Advanced Placement score of 4 or 5 in a foreign language test as noted in the AP/IB chart
  • Higher-Level IB score of 5 or higher in a foreign language test as noted in the AP/IB chart
  • Cambridge A-Level score decided by the appropriate language department
  • SAT II achievement test of 640 or higher in a foreign language.

This requirement is waived for students in B.S.E. programs.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require that students demonstrate their foreign language proficiency through demonstration of the following objective:

  1. Communicates effectively in speech and writing in a human language other than English
Distribution Areas

A course can satisfy only one of the distribution areas

Mathematics and the Natural Sciences

2 courses including 1 lab science course and 7 credits (Those completing the B.F.A. degree need only complete 1 course with lab)

Study in the natural sciences teaches students about the physical world, including matter, energy, and their interrelations and transformations. Students learn to describe, predict, and understand natural phenomena based on empirical evidence obtained from observation and experimentation. Mathematics is the science of number, quantity and space, and may be studied in its own right or as it is applied to other disciplines. Students should have an appreciation of what science is, how science is done, and the mathematical tools used in scientific endeavors to deal with the ever-increasing body of scientific and technical knowledge.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require that the student demonstrate their understanding of mathematics and the natural sciences through the following objectives:

Mathematics:

  1. Solves complex problems requiring the application of mathematics concepts.
  2. Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms.

Natural Sciences

  1. Critically evaluates scientific arguments and understands the limits of scientific knowledge.
  2. Demonstrates proficiency in experimental science by testing hypotheses with the appropriate scientific methodologies.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

2 courses and 6 credits

The Social and Behavioral Sciences encompass the empirical and interpretive study of political, social and economic institutions and the relationships between individuals within a society. Social scientists use multiple methods, including quantitative and qualitative research, to understand human behavior. Newcomb-Tulane College contends that study in the social sciences helps students learn to be active, responsible, and reflective members of society.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require that the student demonstrate their competence in the social and behavioral sciences through the following objectives:

  1. Applies theoretical frameworks to human cultures, societies, polities, and/or group and individual behavior, and/or social issues.
  2. Uses data to analyze human behavior or social phenomena.

Textual and Historical Perspectives

2 courses and 6 credits

Tulane undergraduates should evaluate literary, philosophical, and historical texts. This area of the curriculum introduces exposes students to the methods used to examine and interpret fundamental issues of human experience.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the student to demonstrate their proficiency through the following objectives:

  1.  Interprets literary, philosophical, historical, and artistic materials.
  2. Demonstrates knowledge of the appropriate historical contexts for the course material.

Aesthetics and the Creative Arts

3 credits, which can be fulfilled in 1-3 courses

Newcomb-Tulane undergraduate students should be able to understand the creative process and various forms of artistic expression. The arts are a necessary and fundamental medium through which people communicate, understand, and respond to the complexity and richness of the human experience. Education in the arts helps students to be well-rounded and creative thinkers with the capacity to develop new ideas and enriches their lives by cultivating their sense of aesthetics.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the student to demonstrate their proficiency through one of the following objectives:

  1. Creates or performs artistic works.
  2. Interprets the aesthetic and formal elements of a work or works of art within the appropriate historical and cultural contexts.
Additional Core Requirements

The First Year Seminar

The Tulane Interdisciplinary Experience Seminar (TIDES) Program provides students the opportunity to make meaningful connections with a small group of their peers and some of our best faculty. Active learning, intellectual challenges, and social co-curricular activities define the TIDES experience. To promote interdisciplinary scholarship and an

understanding of mission and scope of the Newcomb-Tulane College, all undergraduates participate in a TIDES seminar during their first year at Tulane. These courses bring together small groups of students and faculty to explore academic topics and the city of New Orleans from multiple academic perspectives.

Requirement: This requirement can be satisfied by TIDES (1 course) or The Honors Colloquium.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the student to demonstrate their competence through the following objectives:

  1. Satisfactorily completes a group assignment, a writing assignment, and an oral assignment.
  2. Applies first-year experiences to the course subject matter.

Public Service

At Tulane, academic service learning is an educational experience based upon a collaborative partnership between the university and local, national, and international communities and partner organizations. Service learning guides students in applying academic knowledge to meet community-identified needs and address systemic inequities. Through structured reflection, students develop critical thinking skills, deepen their academic learning, and gain an enhanced sense of civic responsibility and social justice.

Requirements:

Students develop their commitment to civic engagement through two tiers of service. All students will complete their public service tiers through service-learning courses, an approved public service internship, or an approved public service research experience. These courses can also be used to satisfy other areas of general education.

Tier 1—service-learning courses at the 1000-3000 level to be completed by the end of the 1st semester of Junior year, requiring a minimum of 20 hours of service per semester

Tier 2—options include: service-learning courses at the 3000-level or above, a public service internship, international community engagement programs, Public Service Fellows program, a service independent study course/Honors Thesis, or an approved Study Abroad course--to be completed from the 1st semester as a Sophomore through the last semester as a Senior. These require a minimum of 40 hours of service per semester.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the student to demonstrate their civic engagement through the following objectives:

  1. Articulates an understanding of community and community partnerships.
  2. Identifies civic or public needs through engagement with a community partner.
  3. Reflects on the relationship between the public service engagement and the course subject matter.

Race and Inclusion

One course/3 credits

The Race and Inclusion requirement ensures that all Newcomb-Tulane College graduates are exposed to issues surrounding race and race relations in the United States from many perspectives – historical, political, cultural, economic, artistic, social, and more. This requirement brings to the forefront the histories of underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities in the United States.

Courses that fulfill this requirement will focus on the intersections of race with power, privilege, equity, justice, and/or inclusion and will focus at least 60% their content on these issues in the United States. These courses may also be used to satisfy proficiency or distribution core curriculum requirements.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the students to demonstrate their competence through the following objective:

  1. Analyzes race and/or ethnicity as social constructs in the United States.
  2. Demonstrates an evidence-based understanding of power relationships in the context of race and/or ethnicity in the United States.

Global Perspectives

One course/3 credits

Global Perspectives coursework focuses on a global-international context and provides students with the tools to identify and explore various non-U.S. cultural perspectives. Newcomb-Tulane College seeks to prepare its graduates to be global citizens who are aware of and understand the wider world and their place in it so that they can take an active role in their communities.

Requirements: Courses that fulfill this requirement will focus at least 60% content with stated objectives to develop historical, cultural, and societal knowledge of an area beyond the United States. These courses may also be used to satisfy proficiency or distribution core curriculum requirements.

Learning Outcomes: Courses that fulfill these requirements will require the students to demonstrate their competence through the following objectives:

  1. Analyzes the beliefs, history, social experiences, social structures, artistic or literary expressions, and/or traditions of one or more cultures or societies located outside the United States.
  2. Demonstrates an evidence-based understanding of world events.