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Electric bassist Brian Quezergue's introduction to music began as a child who accompanied his father, legendary composer and arranger Wardell Quezergue, at performances and recording sessions in New Orleans. Also an educator, Quezergue often performs locally with artists such as James Andrews, Stephanie Jordan, and the St. Peter Claver Catholic Church Choir.

The 50-year long career of master guitarist and banjoist Carl LeBlanc includes performing a range of jazz, from traditional to avant-garde. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band alumnus has played with everyone from Fats Domino to Sun Ra.

Jazz at the Rat is a series of live concerts held on selected Thursday evenings at City Diner (a.k.a. Der Rathskeller or "The Rat") at Tulane. Each edition features performances by jazz legends and rising stars, including visiting artists and New Orleans-based musicians, accompanied by students and faculty from Tulane's jazz studies program.   

Parents can ask questions about advising, honors, study abroad, or any of the many other programs and resources offered by Newcomb-Tulane College.  

Join Newcomb-Tulane College Dean James MacLaren, Vice President of Student Affairs Dusty Porter, and a select group of upper division Tulane student leaders in this session designed for parents of new students. Dean MacLaren and Dr. Porter will provide information on the current opportunities and initiatives at Tulane that help prepare Tulane undergraduates to stand apart both professionally and personally to be successful in their careers and endeavors.

The John J. Witmeyer III Dean's Colloquium series, which invites distinguished alumni back to campus to discuss their careers, presents psychiatrist and learning differences specialist Ned Hallowell. He is the founder of the Hallowell Centers, which specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of learning differences, especially attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and dyslexia, in adults and children. Having both ADHD and dyslexia himself, he sees them not as disorders but rather as traits that can confer enormous benefit.

Pianist Jesse McBride, host of Jazz at the Rat, will feature the music of composer, band leader, and pianist Duke Ellington, widely considered as one of the most influential figures in jazz and American music.

Jazz at the Rat is a series of live concerts held on selected Thursday evenings at City Diner (a.k.a. Der Rathskeller or "The Rat") at Tulane. Each edition features performances by jazz legends and rising stars, including visiting artists and New Orleans-based musicians, accompanied by students and faculty from Tulane's jazz studies program.   

Bob Schieffer, legendary television journalist and former host of CBS's Face the Nation, and H. Andrew Schwartz, chief communications officer at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, will discuss their new book about modern political journalism, Overload: Finding the Truth in Today's Deluge of News. From the explosion of fake news to the challenges of the 24-hour news cycle, Schieffer and Schwartz will examine the changing role of media and whether today's citizens are more informed or just overwhelmed. 

The John J. Witmeyer III Dean's Colloquium series, which invites distinguished alumni back to campus to discuss their careers, presents Dr. Ned Hallowell a psychiatrist and learning differences specialist. He is the founder of the Hallowell Centers, which specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of learning differences, especially attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and dyslexia, in adults and children. Having both ADHD and dyslexia himself, he sees them not as disorders but rather as traits that can confer enormous benefit.

Bob Schieffer, legendary television journalist and former host of CBS’s Face the Nation, and H. Andrew Schwartz, chief communications officer at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, will discuss their new book about modern political journalism, Overload: Finding the Truth in Today’s Deluge of News. From the explosion of fake news to the challenges of the 24-hour news cycle, Schieffer and Schwartz will examine the changing role of media and whether today’s citizens are more informed or just overwhelmed.

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